Tag: english

English Lesson: “Other” vs “Another”

English Lesson: “Other” vs “Another”

If you heard the phrase “my another friend”, would you know it’s incorrect English? Would you know how to fix it?

Before we jump into the correction, let’s first review our understanding of “other” and “another”. I think it’s easier to cover “another”, so we’ll do that one first.

When we use “another”, it’s in terms of “one more” or “a new one”. For example, if you’re dining out, you might say:

  • I’d like another drink.
  • Can I have another order of fries?

If you have something that’s getting old (usually a piece of technology), you’ll eventually need to replace it. In this case, we can also use “another” to describe the need for “a new one”:

  • I need to get another phone (mine’s getting old).
  • I need to get another watch (this one’s broken).

However, “other” is used to differentiate between two or more objects. Imagine you’re at a party and your friend asks you to grab his drink off the counter. You might take one and ask, “This one?”

If you’re wrong, your friend will point out, “No, the other one (the different one).”

Here’s another example: your friend points out a dog at the park, but there’s lots of dogs. You notice a cute puppy and ask “That one?” Again, you’re wrong. So your friend has to say “No, the other one.”

So if you wanted to use “other” in the context of friends, how could that work? Maybe you bring two friends to a party and need to introduce them to the crowd. “Here’s my friend Tom, and my other friend Lisa.”

If you think through the context, “my another friend” just doesn’t work.


If you’re interested in learning more conversational English like this, connect with Jon to sign up for online private English coaching or face-to-face sessions in Boston. We’ll work on making you sound like a native speaker.

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English Lesson: 13 Reactions & Responses

English Lesson: 13 Reactions & Responses

A quick and easy English Lesson for this week. This requests come from Masaya who wanted to learn how to react to a conversation besides saying “Oh really?”

  • Ya don’t say?
  • Oh yeah?
  • Huh (it’s better to extend the sound on this; if you keep it short it sounds more harsh)
  • Wow (can also be extended for added effect)
  • Geez (can also be extended)
  • Whoa (can also be extended)
  • Seriously?
  • No way
  • What?
  • Ah, I gotcha
  • Ah, I feel ya
  • Oh, I totally get what you’re saying (be sure to have your rhythm and cadence in order)
  • OH. MY. GOD. (the slower you say this, the more impactful it is)

If you’re interested in learning more conversational English like this, connect with Jon to sign up for online private English coaching or face-to-face sessions in Boston. We’ll work on making you sound like a native speaker.

 

English Lesson: Let’s

English Lesson: Let’s

I never want to see you make this mistake again! Let’s get this right: don’t use a gerund in combination with “let’s”. Don’t know what I’m talking about? Oh, sure you do! I hear it all the time:

  • Let’s eating.
  • Let’s fighting.
  • Let’s doing again.

Wrong. All wrong! Let’s eat. Let’s do it again. Let’s fight– I should point out this is actually calling someone outYou’re trying to pick a fight. Most of you are intending to say something along the lines of: don’t give up or keep it up.

In addition to keeping the verb at its base form, you can also include “go” to sound more conversational.

  • Let’s go eat.
  • Let’s go fight.
  • Let’s go do it again.

Another common one I hear all the time: let’s shopping. The correct way to make the invitation is to say: let’s go shopping.

Some of you might be puzzled because you swear you’ve heard a native speaker use “let’s” in conjunction with a gerund. I’ve seen it too. They’re poking fun at bad grammar. A good example of this would be South Park’s anime episode. It just doesn’t make sense.


 

If you’re interested in learning more conversational English like this, connect with Jon to sign up for private English coaching. We’ll work on making you sound like a native speaker.

 

English Lesson: 5 Phrasal Verbs Using “Call”

English Lesson: 5 Phrasal Verbs Using “Call”

If you want to sound more natural with your English speaking, it’s a good idea to incorporate the use of phrasal verbs— just be sure you don’t carried away and try to use them in every, single sentence.

Phrasal verb overload sounds very un-natural!

For those who don’t know, a phrasal verb is when you take a verb and add a preposition. For example, hang + out = hang out, which means to spend time together.

In this post, let’s cover 5 phrasal verbs that use “call” as the base verb.

  1. call on
  2. call off
  3. call up
  4. call in
  5. call out

1) Call On = to choose, to pick

Example: When I was teaching, I called on different students to answer the questions.

Note: this will be the least common one to use because it requires the speaker to be in a position of authority (i.e. a teacher speaking to students, a manager in a meeting speaking to employees, etc.)

2) Call Off = to cancel, to stop, to postpone

Example: We had to call off the meeting because the boss was sick.

Note: common word associations with “call off” are meetings, parties, plans, dates, and appointments

3) Call Up = to call, to phone

Example: I called up my friends to see what they were doing.

Note: this phrasal verb has no substantial difference in meaning, however, it can be used to sound more conversational and natural

4) Call In = to phone in a place, location, person (implied)

Example: I didn’t go in to work today. I had to call in sick.

Note: be aware of the context. Most of the time you won’t see “call in” by itself, but in the context of “to call in sick”

5) Call Out = to point out, to identify

Example: Jon called out Chase for trying to sneak out of the party.

In that example, Chase wanted to leave the party without anyone knowing. However, Jon didn’t let that happen. He drew attention to Chase, and everyone saw him.

Example: Valerie called out Richelle for not following her diet.

In this example, maybe Richelle made a New Year’s Resolution to lose weight. Valerie is her friend and wants to support her. But when Valerie comes over to hang out, she notices Richelle is eating a big bowl of ice cream. Valerie is pointing out that Richelle is not following her resolution.


 

If you’re interested in learning more conversational English like this, connect with Jon to sign up for private English coaching. We’ll work on making you sound like a native speaker.